Art Director, Filmmaker & Photographer. gabriel@emmetframes.com facebook.com/emmetframes

twitter.com/MrNoriega:

    theatlantic:

An Emmys Mystery: Why Nominate the Worst Part of Arrested Development?

Bateman is an excellent actor, and his character is the ostensible protagonist of Arrested Development. Since the start of the series, he’s played the straight man to his kooky relatives, the guy impressed by how normal he is compared with his hook-having, Magicians’ Alliance-betraying family members. One of the show’s many ironies, of course, is that Michael really isn’t that different, that he shares his kin’s congenital self-centeredness. But in the original Fox seasons, a sense decency and love of family—especially love of son—kept him relatable.

In Season Four, he’s even more central to the show. Famously, showrunner Mitchell Hurwitz struggled to reassemble the old cast for this new run of episodes, and schedules conflicted so much that he ended up having to use green screens and write-around techniques to bring the old ensemble together. Each installment therefore revolves around one particular character in the Bluth family. But Michael always makes an appearance, usually as part of his quest for signatures to obtain the rights to make a movie based on his family’s life.
The most jarring aspect of this season, though, was how show creator Mitchell Hurwitz and his writers seemed to flip a switch on Bateman’s character, turning him into a full-fledged sociopathic weirdo with no explanation of why.
Read more. [Image: Netflix]

    theatlantic:

    An Emmys Mystery: Why Nominate the Worst Part of Arrested Development?

    Bateman is an excellent actor, and his character is the ostensible protagonist of Arrested Development. Since the start of the series, he’s played the straight man to his kooky relatives, the guy impressed by how normal he is compared with his hook-having, Magicians’ Alliance-betraying family members. One of the show’s many ironies, of course, is that Michael really isn’t that different, that he shares his kin’s congenital self-centeredness. But in the original Fox seasons, a sense decency and love of family—especially love of son—kept him relatable.

    In Season Four, he’s even more central to the show. Famously, showrunner Mitchell Hurwitz struggled to reassemble the old cast for this new run of episodes, and schedules conflicted so much that he ended up having to use green screens and write-around techniques to bring the old ensemble together. Each installment therefore revolves around one particular character in the Bluth family. But Michael always makes an appearance, usually as part of his quest for signatures to obtain the rights to make a movie based on his family’s life.

    The most jarring aspect of this season, though, was how show creator Mitchell Hurwitz and his writers seemed to flip a switch on Bateman’s character, turning him into a full-fledged sociopathic weirdo with no explanation of why.

    Read more. [Image: Netflix]

    — 1 year ago with 125 notes
    heisenbergchronicles:

2013 Emmy Nomations are in and Breaking Bad received 13 noms!
Best Drama series: Breaking Bad
Lead Actor in a Drama: Bryan Cranston
Supporting Actor in a Drama: Aaron Paul
Supporting Actor in a Drama: Jonathan Banks
Supporting Actress in a Drama: Anna Gunn
Outstanding Writing for a Drama: George Mastras (5x05: “Dead Freight”)
Outstanding Writing for a Drama: Tom Schnauz (5x07: “Say My Name”)
Outstanding Directing for a Drama: Michelle MacLaren (5x08: “Gliding Over All”)
Outstanding Cinematography for a Multi-Camera Series: Michael Slovis (5x08: “Gliding Over All”)
Outstanding Single-Picture Editing for a Drama: Kelley Dixon (5x08: “Gliding Over All”)
Outstanding Single-Picture Editing for a Drama: Skip MacDonald (5x05: “Dead Freight”)
Outstanding Sound Editing for a Drama: (5x05: “Dead Freight”)
Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama or Comedy: (5x05: “Dead Freight”)

    heisenbergchronicles:

    2013 Emmy Nomations are in and Breaking Bad received 13 noms!

    • Best Drama series: Breaking Bad
    • Lead Actor in a Drama: Bryan Cranston
    • Supporting Actor in a Drama: Aaron Paul
    • Supporting Actor in a Drama: Jonathan Banks
    • Supporting Actress in a Drama: Anna Gunn
    • Outstanding Writing for a Drama: George Mastras (5x05: “Dead Freight”)
    • Outstanding Writing for a Drama: Tom Schnauz (5x07: “Say My Name”)
    • Outstanding Directing for a Drama: Michelle MacLaren (5x08: “Gliding Over All”)
    • Outstanding Cinematography for a Multi-Camera Series: Michael Slovis (5x08: “Gliding Over All”)
    • Outstanding Single-Picture Editing for a Drama: Kelley Dixon (5x08: “Gliding Over All”)
    • Outstanding Single-Picture Editing for a Drama: Skip MacDonald (5x05: “Dead Freight”)
    • Outstanding Sound Editing for a Drama: (5x05: “Dead Freight”)
    • Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama or Comedy: (5x05: “Dead Freight”)
    — 1 year ago with 194 notes

    Mad Men was also nominated for Sound Mixing (good luck giffing that) and Elisabeth Moss was nominated twice, once for Mad Men and once for Top of the Lake.

    (Source: fyeahmm)

    — 1 year ago with 653 notes

    yahooentertainment:

    Aaron Paul got the supporting actor nod and his reaction is priceless! He gave NPH the high five of his life!

    — 1 year ago with 806 notes
    ohcry:

umoron:

i showed this to my brother once and he screamed like a little girl


i love spiders but this photo is fucking scary

    ohcry:

    umoron:

    i showed this to my brother once and he screamed like a little girl

    i love spiders but this photo is fucking scary

    (Source: phelyne, via reproducing)

    — 1 year ago with 4965 notes